A Look Beyond Blade Runner 2049’s Flop At The Box Office

 

Earlier this month, the unparalleled universe of Blade Runner got itself a revival with the blissful release of Blade Runner 2049, announcing the return of the acclaimed Sci-Fi series, 35 years after the screening of the first flick. Not so surprisingly, the long-awaited sequel turned out to be as distinct and compelling as its former, due to its exceptional on-screen and behind-the-scenes cast. However, what was really unanticipated was the film’s weak performance at the box office, and how such brilliant depictions weren’t cherished by the wide cinematic audience, who were quite apathetic about this one.

What you choose to watch is, of course, totally up to you, but future classics as Blade Runner 2049 see the light of day once in a blue moon, so what could justify its plain public appearance? On the other hand, seeing mediocre productions as Geostorm and Tyler Perry’s Madea films top the numeric figures of the box office was another huge disappointment. It’s true that such films, despite their profound dullness, do have an audience, but the minor presence of their fans amidst devoted cinephiles never had those ludicrous features surpass the soul-enriching ones in regards to the financials or the popularity.

Unfortunately, such alteration in the preferences of cinematic audience has significantly impacted the quality of the presented products, yielding numerous films and remakes that only aim for a profitable box-office performance, regardless of their artistic value. This matter became a quite tangible one, as nowadays, you’d often find cinemas filled to the brim with dozens of films that you’d hate to waste your money on for their degenerate standards and absurd foreseeability.

As trivial as they may seem, your movie choices majorly echo on the aspects of mainstream flicks, so please think twice before getting your outing’s movie tickets and don’t let some hyped-up posters drive you away from the real deals, as was the case with Blade Runner 2049.

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